Gladstone Library Retreat: Day Nine

Salley Vickers 2nd collection of short stories

Salley Vickers 2nd collection of short stories

Over lunch with my Norwegian novelist friend we discussed our progress yesterday morning – this post is late because of an event at the library last night (more on this below). We always do this when we hook up in the Gladstone restaurant Food for Thought, which, incidentally, serves spanking gorgeous grub: breakfast, lunch, afternoon cream tea, supper. Did I say I might need to diet after this stay?

Victoria (not a very Norwegian sounding name, I know …) asked what had been the best thing about my morning. I said: ‘Scrapping everything I wrote in the library last night.’ She laughed and asked if I was serious. Of course I was. It meant that this morning I was able to begin a new, relevant scene and, boy, did I enjoy writing it. I’d known last night that most of what I was writing was cobblers but for some inexplicable reason was unable to stop. It was background information and added nothing to the story. Perhaps the writing down means that I know it better? But quite honestly the reader doesn’t need to. It was boring. Good riddance.

We agreed that writing is an odd job – for many reasons more than just this – in that you can feel overjoyed about chucking away hours of labour. And we agreed that we love it.

I have a sense of an ending (thanks Mr Barnes) to my stay and the need to spend as much time as possible in my favourite place in the library – the gallery of the Theology Reading Room, but I wrote over 1,000 ‘good’ words yesterday and I took a few hours out to catch up with my sister. We headed to a spa, so yet another indulgence.

And last night the library hosted the very splendid Salley Vickers for ‘An Evening with …’. I heard Salley speak at GladFest last September so knew we were in for a treat. She spoke about her seven novels and how they have informed her latest collection of short stories, The Boy Who Could See Death, the enduring significance of old stories and why it’s always good to pinch them (‘you don’t have to think of a plot’) and how she doesn’t plan her writing, at all. I’m not familiar with Salley’s work but will purchase a copy of The Cleaner of Chartres before I leave. Inspirational on many levels, I learnt a lot. Victoria and I had the pleasure of Salley’s company over wine in the reading room once the audience had gone home too. We talked Edinburgh (the festival), travelling and the eye-watering cost of London property! Oslo is much cheaper, apparently.

My time is running out here, so I’m off to the library now.

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8 thoughts on “Gladstone Library Retreat: Day Nine

  1. Thanks, Jane. Yes, it’s been the perfect mixture of work and pleasure. Feel very lucky to have had the time and space here and also to have met such interesting people. True connections and meeting of minds. Quite rare, really. Hope all good with you. x

    • It does sound magical. What an opportunity. Inspirational too. Am glad for you. 🙂 Yep, all good with me, just waiting for things to be completed and that is out of my hands now, otherwise all good thanks. xx

  2. Carol Lovekin says:

    I’ve enjoyed reading this & the rest from Day One. Thank you! It sounds like the perfect place to write. In spite of, ‘Scrapping everything I wrote in the library last night,’ you’ve clearly gathered a serious body of work together. Congratulations!

    • Thanks, Carol. There’s a body of work, for sure. How serious it is remains to be seen! Very early days … and there’ll be copy editing to do on the Jan release next month so we’ll see how it goes. Best wishes.

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