Writing Groups & their uses by guest author Kitty Campanile

Today, I’m delighted to introduce Kitty Campanile, an indie author who has recently published a novel set against the backdrop of the 1984/85 Miners’ Strike. When I wrote my own ‘miners’ strike’ novel in 2012, I was surprised at how underexplored in fiction the strike was, particularly from the female perspective; it was a driving force in the decision to write the book. It looks like this is changing. Anyway, Kitty’s here to talk about writing groups and their benefits, in particular the support she received. Over to you, Kitty.

Book Cover-Mighty Like A RoseWriting can be a solitary occupation, and for a self published author it really is a one man show – unless you can find a little help from your friends. I have been going to Woking Writers’ Circle for nearly two years now, having bumped into one of the members at an open mic event.

We meet once a month. Between seven and a dozen members turn up and we’ll each have a ten minute slot to read and get feedback. Each month there is a homework which can get inspiration flowing, or you can bring in whatever you are working on for criticism and feedback. We have a range of writers from a range of backgrounds. Poets, essayists, short story writers and novelists with very different styles all come together. I have learned as much from critically listening to the work of others as from the critique of my own work.

As well as feedback, the encouragement is valuable. Mighty Like a Rose nearly wasn’t written. It started out as a NaNoWriMo project, by the end of November 2013 I had a few chapters and a lot of self doubt. It’s rare for me to not take anything to writers’ circle but I just couldn’t write anything. I explained to the group I had started a novel but wasn’t happy with what I had so far. Greg, one of the Writer’s Circle stalwarts, offered to read what I had and gave me enough encouragement to continue with the project, as well as line-by line feedback on what I had written. Although I didn’t take every chapter in, each month the others would ask how it was going, how many words, how long until I was finished. When I did bring a pivotal chapter in to read, I got useful feedback from my colleagues and was able to talk more about the story in the pub afterwards! Having a group of people take an interest kept my enthusiasm going, there’s a temptation (especially at the editing stage) to put a long-term project on the back burner and start something shiny and new. Although I still worked on short pieces, the group helped me stay focussed. Aside from the Writers’ Circle, I have called on more informal groups to help. I got a few woman from an online feminist knitting group to beta read – it was important for me to get international readers as I was concerned the Yorkshire dialogue might not be understandable, or that I might be assuming too much knowledge of the miners’ strike. Another friend (a member of my ukulele band who has published before) proof-read all 90,000 words for a pint (which I haven’t bought him yet). Indebted as I am to this eclectic group of friends, I couldn’t have finished the book without the Writers’ Circle.

Kitty portraitMighty Like a Rose, a tale of love, friendship and solidarity, set against the backdrop of the 1984-85 Miners’ Strike, is available in paperback or as an e-book from Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mighty-Like-Rose-Thornethorpe-Saga/dp/1507524749/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1423092336&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=kitty+campanile

Find out more about Woking Writers’ Circle at https://wokingwriters.wordpress.com/

Thanks so much for popping by, Kitty and best of British with the book.

What’s the story 2014?

It’s been an especially good year for great fiction with the release of cracking debuts and stunning works from more established authors. You can read my personal pick of the best here.

photo by Sarah Smith

photo by Sarah Smith

And 2014 has been a good year for me personally. So much to celebrate and enjoy, and lots of hard work too; I find the two are often connected. Where to start? In classic chronological style perhaps? *listen to the sound of me opening my Mslexia diary*

March 2014 saw the release of my ‘miners’ strike’ novel Public Battles, Private Wars (in fact, it’s about complex friendships, rivalry, love and finding the best of yourself in difficult circumstances – oh, and lots of cakes!). Publication coincided with the 30 year anniversary of the landmark strike and as a result I found myself appearing on radio, newspapers, blogs and e-zines all over the shop, including BBC Radio, the Western Mail, and the Yorkshire Post. My publicist at the super-fabulous Accent Press worked extremely hard for me – as did my wonderful editor – and I am so grateful to the entire team for their faith in me and the book. Reviews have been terrific and out-performed my expectations.

Edinburgh-Aug 2014 115This year I was fortunate enough to be offered appearances at literary festivals too, starting with a reading at Grit Lit in my home town, Brighton.  Then an all-day event at the Feminist Library in London on a baking hot June day. I spoke alongside Dr Katy Shaw of Brighton University, a leading expert on literature of the miners’ strike. Thanks to a friend, I was also a last minute speaker at The Big Book Club in the Barn event – 19 Sussex book groups (about 120 people) in a barn gathered to talk books and drink wine – my idea of heaven! Later in the summer, I appeared at GladFest – a dynamic festival in north Wales at the stunning Gladstone Library. My workshop sold out, much to my amazement.

WH Smith Show Card with author (3)After this came the Richmond Books and Boots Festival (Yorkshire, not London) where I spoke to a group of 25-odd readers at the town library about the novel. The reception was wonderful. In amongst these events, I have spoken with a number of local book groups and I did my first ever book shop signing at WH Smith Cardiff in the autumn. Lots of travelling, lots of talking, lots of fun.

2014 wasn’t all about the novel either. A short story, Deep, Dark and Dangerous, made the final ten of the inaugural Brighton Prize competition. Delivered by spoken word organisation Rattle Tales, it has a prize of £400 so worth looking out for in 2015. The winners were announced at a live event – there was champagne and roses for all the shortlisted writers too.

Resized cover imageSpring saw the launch of a special anthology of prose and poetry from Blinding Books, an independent publisher spearheaded by Richard Penny. I was thrilled when Richard approached me and asked if the collection, My Baby Shot Me Down, might include two stories of mine: The Whispering Wall and Buried. Another story, The Difference Between Us, appears in Accent Press’ summer anthology: Holiday Fling. If you’re feeling cold and dreaming of long hot days this might transport you there right now.

Holiday FlingAnd as if 2014 couldn’t get any better regarding my short fiction, I was over the moon to discover that another story had been selected to appear in an anthology of Gothic fiction published by Parthian Books. It contains work by some fine, fine writers and I am flattered (and astonished) to be included. The collection was launched at an event in October and the paperback of A Flock of Shadows will be available in good book shops in February.

OK, so this review isn’t exactly chronological but life is full of unexpected twists and turns, no? And because life can’t be wonderful all of the time – nor should we wish it to be so – we should savour the beautiful moments – little and large.

Right now, as I look back over the year and at what has been achieved, I cannot imagine 2015 being as hectic, though a part of me hopes that it is. Already, there are some special things lined up – a writing retreat at the Gladstone as part of a sponsorship for one thing – and early in 2015 there’ll be an exciting announcement (at least for me). I’ll keep you posted.

All that remains is to wave 2014 goodbye – it was good knowing you – and wish everyone a Happy, Healthy and Productive 2015.

Do you like my sheep pencil? I'm part Welsh, you know.

Do you like my sheep pencil? I’m part Welsh, you know.

Books and Boots and High, High Heels – and Pride

Sept 2014 011Books and Boots is the fabulous name of a walking and book festival held in Richmond, North Yorkshire. The festival is the brain-child of Anne Wicks, former owner of the Castle Hill Bookshop – a gorgeous independent shop nestled at the foot of the castle in this ancient town, which has been serving book lovers in Richmond and the surrounding Yorkshire Dales for over 30 years. The bookshop works with a community initiative and Gillian Howells creative consultancy to run the festival, and this year was its 10th anniversary.

As the name suggests the festival boasts a diverse programme of walks and talks and bookish events in and around the town. From ghost tours to mountain hikes to literary discussions there’s a lot to see and do, and in between there’s the town itself to explore (an absolute treat) and you can explore the dales independently too, of course. Now, I’m not a hiker – take a look at the shoes I bought while I was there – so I was all about the books and I was there as a guest. (OK, the heels aren’t sky scrapers, but they’re high enough for me.)

Sept 2014 007On Monday evening, I spoke with a group of book club members in the library, all of whom had read my novel, Public Battles, Private Wars. The audience were warm, attentive and had loads of brilliant questions, and two hours passed by in a flash. To my surprise they even wanted me to read from the book – not just one extract but two.

I felt privileged to part of this festival, because it really is very special and yet it’s not as well-known as many I can think of. Do check it out next year and if you’re in the area do visit the town – it’s stunning – and Castle Hill Bookshop which is a delight to browse around. It’s only small but feels much, much larger; it has a Tardis-like quality.

In other news this week, once back from the festival I had chance to hoof it down to my local cinema and catch the movie, Pride. What a treat that was too. Wonderful. Funny, touching, sad in places, it’s a great British film. The attention to period detail was brilliant – right down to the ‘angry’ theatre company van the LGSM group use to travel to the valleys of south Wales. Readers at a book group I talked with in Brighton a couple of weeks ago likened Public Battles, Private Wars to the film, and now that I’ve seen it I am truly flattered. I’ll also add that I agree with those readers – if you’ve enjoyed Pride you’ll probably get a lot out of my novel.

Shoes I bought in Richmond!

Shoes I bought in Richmond!

Budget food 80s style, Part 9: Baked Stuffed Hearts

Not a baked heart! But made with love!

Not a baked heart! But made with love!

On this, the 30th anniversary of a defining moment in British history and the strike – The Battle of Orgreave – immortalised by artist Jeremy Deller, author David Peace and poet Helen Mort. I’m sharing another offal recipe – Baked Stuffed Hearts. Why? Because the strike was full of passion and my novel, Public Battles, Private Wars, has been described by book blogger Tracy Terry at Pen and Paper as a novel with a big heart.

You will need:

4 calves hearts

Pork Sausage Stuffing

50g/2oz of butter

3 tablespoons of stock or water if you’ve no stock

To prepare:

Wash hearts well

Remove veins and fat. Dry thoroughly

Cut through centre divisions to make 1 cavity in each heart

Fill loosely with stuffing

Transfer to casserole dish

Dot with butter. Pour in stock water

Cook, tightly covered, in the centre of a moderate oven (160C/325F or Gas Mark 3) for an hour and a half

Baste well

Continue to cook, uncovered, for a further 30 minutes (or until tender)

Serve with Creamed Potatoes, Brown Sauce and Redcurrant jelly.

On the 18th June 1984 striking miners clashed with riot police, many with shields and on horseback, in the fields outside the Orgreave coking plant in South Yorkshire. In 1991 South Yorkshire Police force paid out over half a million pounds in compensation to miners arrested during the struggle.